A soulful memory of a doleful day

11910885_10109279271173074_1214778169_nToday’s Sentence of the Day comes from “The Glory of Their Times,” an absolute joy of a book.
Written by Lawrence K. Ritter, a former Chief of the Domestic Research Division at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, the 1966 book is an oral history of turn of the century baseball.
It is considered by some to be the best baseball book ever written.
One of the chapters is about Specs Toporcer, whom I knew nothing about (That doesn’t happen a lot when it comes to old baseball players).
Toporcer talks about growing up and getting a job, for 50 cents a week, in which he would relate the baseball scores as they came over a Western Union ticker to a scoreboard in a saloon.
He talks about having to give the score of when his favorite team lost the World Series after having a lead in the ninth inning.

“After it was all over, I sat on the platform silently reading and re-reading the doleful news on the tape, as though repeated reading would erase the awful words.”

I love that he used the word “doleful.” You don’t see that word used anymore. About as often as you see someone nicknamed “Specs.”
Anyway, my father once said that I rewatched a video of the 1993 World Series so many times, he was convinced that one day he’d be walking by and Joe Carter’s home run would drift foul and our Phillies would win the World Series.

Every day, The Southpaw finds a sentence that makes him think or laugh. It can come from a song, a poem, a book, a newspaper article. It’s a daily celebration of our odd – and yet beautiful – language.

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A soulful memory of a doleful day

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